P is for Pedantic Paragon….

P is for Pedantic Paragon …

pe·dan·tic  

/pəˈdantik/

Adjective

Of or like a pedant.

Synonyms

punctilious – donnish – priggish – meticulous

 

par·a·gon

n.

1. A model of excellence or perfection of a kind; a peerless example: a paragon of virtue.

2.

a. An unflawed diamond weighing at least 100 carats.

b. A very large spherical pearl.

3. Printing A type size of 20 points.

tr.v. par·a·goned, par·a·gon·ing, par·a·gons

1. To compare; parallel.

2. To equal; match.

 

I’m late and remiss. So many things happened last night that way-laid the whole A To Z Challenge that I’m taking advantage of a short break during a library meeting to skitter around and write this blog post. Of course, I clandestinely wrote the poem during one of the presentations, but I won’t tell if you won’t.

When I asked Tim for a “P” word yesterday, he sighed PROFOUNDLY and said, “I’m working on Salt Chuck [Mine Report]. Your word is ‘pedantic.’” Yes, it’s an archaeological report he’s working on, but the whole history of the mine on Prince of Wales Island is far from pedestrian, although, most of the information was found “down among the weeds,” and so, I suppose it could fit the definition of “obscure.” But he didn’t stop there. “But, I still like the word ‘paragon.’”

Pedantic Paragon.

“Can there be such a thing?” he asked. I’d come across the diamond part of the definition. An enormous, unflawed diamond, what could be more beautiful? My husband, for one. My kids, for two others. I began to get all philosophical after all that happened yesterday, and then it became a question of worth and what we deem valuable. Truly… what is your paragon? Is it physical? Is  your paragon different than someone else’s? Of course it is, because we all value different things, but for one of the accepted definitions to involve a flawless diamond says something about the world—that that would be a universally accepted idea of the epitome of beauty. I suppose …

Poetry Form: Haiku (because yesterday, April 17th, was some kind of National Haiku day)

Japanese poetry seems to be gaining greater and greater popularity with Western poets. The much abused Haiku of course has worn the brunt of this assault by everyone from first year poetry teachers and students, to Microsoft and office jokes, but serious poets recognise that this little poem is a truly remarkable art form. (lifted, shamelessly, from www.thepoetsgarret.com)

Paragon glimmers

Some pedantic, arcane shard

Weighed against your soul.