D is for Dime ….

Senryū

Senryū (川柳?, literally ‘river willow’) is a Japanese form of short poetry similar to haiku in construction: three lines with 17 or fewer total morae (or “on“, often translated as syllables, but see the article on onji for distinctions). Senryū tend to be about human foibles while haiku tend to be about nature, and senryū are often cynical or darkly humorous while haiku are more serious. Unlike haiku, senryū do not include a kireji (cutting word), and do not generally include a kigo, or season word.

The Dime.

It’s been fun and games at the Marshall house with this whole A To Z Challenge, but I reserved “D” for me. Dime. You probably don’t know me. Maybe you do. Maybe you’ve read this blog or my tweets or my Facebook page. But you most likely haven’t. I’m not writing about any old dime. I’m writing about THE DIME. There’s one dime in my life that I would give anything to hold in my hand. If I’m lucky, it’s in an evidence folder somewhere squirreled away in the recesses of the Lawrence, Kansas Police Department. When I make it back to Lawrence someday soon, I’ll be able to open that folder and touch it. If I’m unlucky, it’s wound its way through thousands of hands, stuffed into pockets and jars, kicked into a gutter and found by a child, spent in one of those vending machines that USED to take dimes … or as a tip on a counter of a diner somewhere–fished haphazardly out of a pocket and tossed, unceremoniously upon formica. All the while, every hand that’s touched it is unaware of the simple significance of that one dime…. and the phone call it was supposed to ensure …

You see, in 1964, a phone call cost a dime. There were no cell phones, no credit card swipers, but there were payphones.

The baby was naked and was lying on an old blanket … The cheap, white blanket was not wrapped around the baby, however, the chief said.

The Dime

You gave

The costliest of gifts

When found, the baby was cold. The weather was 42 degrees outside at that time. However, it was believed the infant child couldn’t have been in the launderette long or it might have frozen to death.

The Dime

You left

To not abandon me…

 

“We first thought somebody might have left her at the launderette to die, but if that had been their aim they would have left the baby outside. I feel they really wanted her to be found and cared for because a dime was left by the telephone, apparently so somebody could call the minute the child was found. She wasn’t wrapped up and was cold, but she could have wiggled out of the cover.”

The dime

I seek

Is cold compassion

Chief Troelstrup said a dime was found on top of a pay telephone in the launderette. “It’s possible,” he said, “that whoever let the baby also left the dime to make sure whoever found the child would be able to call for assistance.”

The dime

I seek

Is cold compassion

 

Police said today they still have no idea on the parents of Amy.

The dime

Your gift

My mystery lingers

 

“The only problem,” Detective Lt. Dick Stanwix said today, “is that they [the nurses] are becoming so attached to the baby they are going to have a hard time giving her up.”

 

The dime

I hold

Is love in my hand.

 

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